As Hard Fork Closes In, Ethereum Developers Hit a Bump with Geth.

Ethereum

Just days before the highly anticipated Byzantium’s hard fork, Ethereum developers discovered a denial-of-service (DoS) vulnerability in their most popular client’s software. Upon this discovery, the Geth team quickly issued a new software release,  fixing this bug.

Unfortunately, from the current statistics from the blockchain site Ether Nodes, it shows a relatively low upgrade rate. At the current time, only 1.9 of the current Geth nodes are up-to-date.

Geth, the most popular Ethereum software, holds about 75 percent of all Ethereum nodes. Without the new software release update, it could leave most nodes more susceptible to DoS attacks after the hard-fork.  

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Other Ethereum node software groups have gotten on board with bug fixes, ahead of the big update to come.

Parity, Ethereum’s second-largest software client, supplied a new release  of its software correcting a “consensus bug.” Less than 20 percent of these nodes have been updated, which is pressing as the bug could potentially cause the network to separate during the fork.

Unexpected complications

The tests leading up to the hard fork have uncovered an unprecedented amount of difficulties and issues with the current software. These complications have developers questioning future approaches to their hard fork release processes. With all the updates needed before the hard fork, discussions have begun about the possibility of postponing Byzantium. Postponing the update also uncovers risks with such little time before the fork.

An Ethereum developer, Casey Detrio, spoke to CoinDesk and explained that “updating is not necessarily a quick and easy process for users with extensive infrastructure,” such as mining pools or exchanges, which require an ample amount of time to be done efficiently.

He added:

“The second concern is that there may be more undiscovered consensus bugs that could be found after the activation block, which would then result in needing to perform emergency client updates.”

Featured Image: unsplashIlya Pavlov

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